Linguistics – The Free Speech EP

Linguistics – The Free Speech EP

Excellent flow, cool synths, earworm-y samples – Linguistics hits all the right tones with this EP. I’ve added the “trip-hop” tag mainly for the excellent production work and vox – it’s not Emancipator, but it’s certainly chill hip-hop. If you liked Lems! you’ll like Linguistics. Real talk, too – Linguistics has some great rhymes, and the title track is particularly worth a listen.

Guts – Freedom

Guts – Freedom

guts - freedom

queenslandhomes.com.au:

With a career spanning 20 years, French maestro beatsmith Guts is back, this time working alongside the artist Mambo for the Freedom art and music project. Guts is known for his genius use of old vinyl samples, hip hop beats, spoken word and instrumental mix ups, and as this album is entirely mastered in analogue, it’s pure old school sensibility and seriously cool.

Listen on Google Play Music

Guts – Le Bienheureux

Guts – Le Bienheureux

Guts - Le Bienheureux

ravemagazine.com:

With Le Bienheureux, Guts joins that company, providing an album of sunny, old-school urban beats complemented with some skilful sampling work (see the downbeat jazz of Narco Trip, or the Gary-Farmer-quoting-William-Blake sample from Dead Man that provides Endless Night with its title). This album’s highlights are great – see Triple J fodder And The Living Is Easy for proof – but, unfortunately, much of the album is pure, unaccompanied beats and melodies

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Nosaj Thing – Drift

Nosaj Thing – Drift

nosaj thing - drift

pitchfork.com:

This magpie ear for odd, leftfield sounds is Drift’s most explicit link to glitch-hop. The endlessly pinging synthesizer on “Light #1” seems to careen off every available surface, while it’s companion “Light #2” builds from a prism of Tron-like laser blurts. Chung clearly relishes a good rug-pulling, and he plays a thousand little tricks on your senses throughout the record– breathing sounds fluttering high in the mix, echoing, hall-of-mirrors synthesizers.

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Deltron 3030 – s/t

Deltron 3030 – Deltron 3030

sputnikmusic.com:

An amalgam of classic battle rhymes, tongue-in-cheek humor and old school braggadocio, Del has been at the forefront of the resurgence of old school hip hop mentalities. Deltron 3030, despite being futuristic in theme, captures many of these fundamental tenants that went missing somewhere along the time ultra-violent rap went multi-platinum.
While Del brings the lyrical heat, Kid Koala mans the tables, adding flavor to album mastermind Dan “The Automator” Nakamura’s beat compositions. Both Kid Koala (Eric San) and Nakamura are classically trained musicians which is especially obvious in the latter’s dense and skilled production.”

Lems – A, B, C!!

Lems – A, B, C!!

I couldn’t find any reviews for this album, so I’ll do my best. This album features pretty supreme samples, excellent jazz beats and sways, a few hip-hop guest artists, and a lot of feel-good. Some of the backbeat approaches a glitchy, electronic swing, similar to Parov Stelar or Caravan Palace.

Why? – Alopecia

Why? – Alopecia

why? - alopecia

pitchfork.com:

“Unclassifiable” is usually lazy shorthand for albums featuring both guitars and keyboards. Alopecia is a liquid in the sieve of genre: put it on headphones and it begs to bump; recite lyrics aloud and people will look at you with loathing usually reserved for religious leaflet canvassers and slam poets; try and decode the words in your head and you’ll only hear the melodies behind them. As for his lyrics, it’s wrong to call them stream-of-consciousness, since that implies Wolf is a poor self-editor; nothing about Alopecia is lazy. It’s more like 5 a.m. journal entries cut up and turned to collage. Clearly, every line won’t be pure gold, but they all add up to something.

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The Notorious B.I.G. vs. The XX – Dead Wrong Intro

The Notorious B.I.G. vs. The XX – Dead Wrong Intro

Hot Chip – Coming On Strong

Hot Chip – Coming On Strong

hot-chip-coming-on-strong

pitchfork.com:

Hot Chip wear influences like yellow Livestrong bracelets– quietly, gallantly, but a bit too noticeably. The Beach Boys, Prince, Ween, 60s girl groups, Dr. Dre, Devo, Stevie Wonder, Madlib: Each hallmark has their moment, or idea borrowed. The sum of inspiration isn’t always rectitude, but Hot Chip make it work for them. American heavyweight counterparts LCD Soundsystem, a more forceful, knowing act, are clearly an influence, and “Down With Prince” is Hot Chip’s “Daft Punk Is Playing at My House”. Admiration is draped all over the production– clipped hollow snares, noodly bass line, funk keyboards– and it’s impressive that they don’t get us rolling on the ground with an opener like “I’m sick of motherfuckers tryna tell me that they’re down with Prince.”

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Cee-Lo Green – No Ones Gonna Love You (Band of Horses Cover)